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Celebrate Casimir Pulaski Day At The Polish Museum of America

Since 1977, Illinoisans have declared the first Monday of March an official state holiday in honor of Casimir Pulaski.

The Polish Museum of America will celebrate Casimir Pulaski during his annual holiday.
Julita Siegel / Provided
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NOBLE SQUARE — Since 1977, Illinoisans have declared the first Monday of March an official state holiday in honor of Casimir Pulaski.

Perhaps no one has celebrated the day more than Chicago’s Polish community, who will honor his legacy during an annual celebration at the Polish Museum of America, 984 N. Milwaukee Ave.

From 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday, local, state and national leaders will celebrate Pulaski Day in the museum’s Sabina P. Logisz Great Hall.

Admission is free and refreshments will be provided.

Pulaski fought for freedom in both Poland and America, and in that, he represents the ties between the two countries, said PMA volunteer Daniel Pogorzelski.

Participants “will be paying respects to a hero of two countries,” he said. “We are honoring the ties between these two different lands connected by the people who immigrated here over last two centuries.”

For more information on Monday’s event, visit the PMA’s website.

Pulaski was born in Warsaw in 1745. He fought against Polish King Stanislaw II. In 1775, Pulaski was exiled to France, where he met the marquis de Lafayette and Benjamin Franklin.

Pulaski came to America to fight in the Revolutionary War. At the direction of then-General George Washington, he established the Pulaski Legion, a group of other European soldiers. The Legion protected Charleston, S.C., from British occupation.

In 1779, at the age of 34, Pulaski died from battle wounds in Savannah, Georgia.

Monday’s festivities include a wreath-laying ceremony at Stanislaw Batowski’s painting of Pulaski at Savannah. 

Credit: Julita Siegel / Provided
The Polish Museum of America will celebrate Casimir Pulaski during his annual holiday.

Museum hours are 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday-Tuesday and 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Wednesdays. Final admission is 45 minutes before close.

While you’re there, you can also check out The World of Tomorrow, a temporary display of artifacts from the Polish Pavilion during the 1939 World’s Far in New York City.

The exhibit ends May 10.

Credit: Julita Siegel / Provided
Artifacts from the Polish Pavilion during the 1939 World’s Fair in New York City.

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