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Logan Square, Humboldt Park, Avondale

Need Fresh Produce — And A Lover? The ‘Horny’ Logan Square Farmers Market Is The Place To Be, Locals Say

Neighbors say your soulmate could be among the nearly 7,000 weekly wanderers at the farmers market. The Logan Square Chamber of Commerce wants to help you find them with a singles event.

The organizers of the Logan Square Farmers Market are hosting a singles event called "Mingle at the Market" Oct. 16.
Kayleigh Padar/Block Club Chicago
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LOGAN SQUARE — Is there any better way to find your soulmate than to brush hands with them while sampling organic cheese at the Logan Square Farmers Market?

The popular Sunday market, 3025-3113 W. Logan Blvd., has developed a reputation for being “horny” since its launch in 2005, with neighbors regularly posting online about its flirty atmosphere. What makes it so hot? It’s not just the warmth from the raclette table — there are just lots of hip, single folks at the market, which can lead to chemistry, neighbors said.

The vibe is a popular topic on the Logan Square Community Facebook page, where people frequently refer to the event as just the “horny farmers market.” The posts have taken on a life of their own, becoming an inside joke among neighbors who use the market as much for groceries as they do for people watching — or picking up dates.

Jeremy Bersano, who’s lived in Logan Square for nearly 20 years, said he’s seen the farmers market evolve from just a few vendors to a sprawling community staple where people come together under the guise of grocery shopping. 

“The farmers market has always had a ‘come as you are’ feeling, but I feel like when the neighborhood started to get ‘cooler,’ it became a place to see and be seen,” Bersano said. “You can definitely come as you are — there are people in sweatpants and flip flops — but you can also come as you want to be seen.

“It’s a place where everyone can fly their own flag, show the world who they are — and see if they run into someone who appreciates that.” 

But with nearly 7,000 people strutting through the market each Sunday, casually bumping into your perfect partner can be as challenging as securing a bouquet of fresh flowers for them before they sell out. 

The Logan Square Chamber of Commerce wants to help by harnessing the romantic energy of the farmers market with a singles event called Mingle At The Market 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 16, said Executive Director Nilda Esparza. 

For $25, anyone can experience the market’s matchmaking powers with music, drinks and fresh charcuterie platters.

Tickets aren’t available to buy yet, but more information will be posted on the market’s Instagram and website.

“The fall’s perfect timing — you can get boo’d up before the winter,” Esparza said.  

“And maybe we’ll see more strollers at the market next spring,” said Frankie Marron, the chamber of commerce’s social media director. 

Esparza and Marron started planning the event after seeing people repeatedly post online about the market’s fashionable and flirty atmosphere. 

“It was just week after week, seeing these posts, and I always laugh so hard reading them,” Marron said. “It’ll be a Monday, and I’ll see people posting, ‘Who’s going to be at the horny farmers market this week?’”

Even seemingly unrelated posts in the neighborhood Facebook group have turned into jokes about the market. When people have posted to ask their neighbors for advice about finding a date, residents chime in to suggest the market. In May, another neighbor asked how other Logan Square residents felt about the recent city remapping, a seemingly serious topic.

“Of course, I welcome public discourse, as long as it includes comments on the horny farmers market,” she added.

It’s not clear when the event turned into a meat market — albeit one where the vendors are regularly offering cruelty-free cuts — but the Facebook page has posts dating back to at least 2021, when the world was reopening amid COVID-19. At one point, someone posted about the changing market mood.

“I have never worried about my haircut or what I was going to wear to the market until this farmers market season kicked off!” one commenter admitted.

“It’s the vegetable shapes,” someone suggested.

Marcus Kirby, owner of The Succulent City, offered sage advice: “Everyone’s been trapped inside for a year. Let my people hoe.”

Esparza said the market’s romantic atmosphere came about “organically.” 

No one is slipping love potions into the vendors’ cold-pressed juices; it’s just that the residents of Logan Square are “young and chic,” Esparza said. 

“It’s a very fashionable market, so I think that helps create the vibe people talk about,” Esparza said. “When everyone was at home during COVID, we realized our market became a destination for people to come hang out, to people watch. It became something for people to dress up for, even if they weren’t actually shopping.” 

Although he wasn’t aware of the market’s reputation, Alex Hoffman, who was at the market Sunday, said the weekly event has more of a community feel than others he’s been to since there’s usually live music, informal yard sales nearby and people mingling outside. 

“Having a singles event here sounds like a great idea,” said Hoffman, 32, of Uptown. “I think it’d feel more low-stakes than other kinds of events where you’d meet people cycling through tables at a bar. Meeting people here is more open-ended and less intimidating in a lot of ways.” 

Corrine Yonan said there’s no better place than the Logan Square Farmers Market to bring a date or to people-watch while picking up quality groceries. She still makes the trek frequently, though she recently moved to Ukrainian Village.  

“Of course, I’ve heard that the farmers market is horny and that it’s a great place to find a date,” the 27-year-old said. “I completely agree — that’s why I dress up every time I come here. It’s a trendy, hip neighborhood, so there’s lots of people in their 20s instead of people with their kids.

“Everyone just loves to look cool going out on a Sunday.” 

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