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Lakeview, Wrigleyville, Northalsted

Despite Post-Pride Stabbings, Shootings, Lakeview Alderman Says Police ‘Did A Very Good Job’

Local Ald. Tom Tunney, who said last week he was "deeply concerned" about the Chicago Police Department's post-parade plans, said officers responded "amazingly well" to the mayhem.

Street traffic continues as normal at the intersection of Halsted, Barry and Clark hours after a shooting occurred near the intersection following the Pride Parade, in the early hours of June 27, 2022.
Colin Boyle/Block Club Chicago
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LAKEVIEW — Three people were shot, another three were stabbed and 26 people were arrested late Sunday and early Monday as crowds were out celebrating after Chicago’s LGBTQ Pride Parade, police said.

Chicago Police Supt. David Brown announced the arrests during a news conference Monday, describing the post-parade hours as “drunken, rowdy behavior” that was “very challenging” for officers to handle.

The shooting happened just before 1:30 a.m. in the 3100 block of North Clark Street, near the intersection of Clark, Halsted Street and Barry Avenue, according to Chicago Police.

Two men and a woman were outside when someone fired shots at them, police said. One of the men, who is 30 years old, was hit in his knee and taken in good condition to Illinois Masonic Medical Center.

The second man, 37, was shot in his leg and taken in good condition to Northwestern Hospital, police said. The woman, 46, was struck in her abdomen and taken in critical condition to Illinois Masonic.

None of the people wounded gave additional details on the incident, police said.

Officers who were stationed nearby “reacted swiftly” and arrested a person of interest who was being questioned Monday afternoon, Brown said. Police also found a gun.

The stabbing happened about two hours earlier when a fight broke out at 11:27 p.m. Sunday in the 1000 block of West Belmont Avenue, police said.

A 24-year-old woman was in an argument with two women and a man that became physical, police said. The woman drew a knife and began swinging it at the other three, making contact with each of them.

A 28-year-old woman was stabbed in the chest, arm and back and listed in serious condition, police said. A 20-year-old man was in fair condition with a stab wound to the back and a 35-year-old woman was stabbed in the buttocks and in good condition.

All three victims were taken to Illinois Masonic Medical Center, police said.

The 24-year-old woman who allegedly stabbed them was also taken to Illinois Masonic with a laceration to her face, police said. She was in fair condition.

Charges were still pending Monday morning, police said.

Both incidents happened several hours after the Chicago Pride Parade wrapped up in Lakeview, and many were still out in the neighborhood celebrating.

“Just hours earlier, people from all backgrounds, including families and their children, were out together, celebrating,” Brown said. “No Chicagoan should have to think twice about their safety.”

Local Ald. Tom Tunney (44th), who said last week he was “deeply concerned” about the Chicago Police Department’s post-parade plans, said officers responded “amazingly well” to the mayhem.

Credit: Colin Boyle/Block Club Chicago
Police barricades sit at the intersection of Halsted, Barry and Clark hours after a shooting occurred near the intersection following the Pride Parade, in the early hours of June 27, 2022.

“Unfortunately there were a couple incidents, but given the length of time and the amount of people, I think police did a good job,” Tunney said.

Tunney sent a letter to Supt. David Brown on Tuesday to ask for more police resources along the parade route throughout the weekend. The Police Department must boost the number of officers at the parade and in the area since there’s been a two-year lull in regular festivities and this could be the largest Pride in city history, Tunney wrote.

Northalsted has already seen “large, sometimes rowdy” crowds at night recently, Tunney wrote. He said he was “very troubled” by a large fight outside the bars early June 20, hours after Pride Fest ended.

“I put out a clarion call last week for more resources post-parade, meaning from 7 in the evening until 3 or 4 in the morning, and the police did respond amazingly well in terms of show of force [and] trying to keep the crowds relatively safe and in order,” Tunney said.

The police department had about 10-15 officers stationed at almost every corner in Tunney’s ward, he said. But some of the issues arose around 10-11 p.m. when officers were undergoing shift change, he said.

“We found a lot of resources were dwindling and the large crowds were still staying and getting louder,” Tunney said. “We were very concerned about [them] taking over the streets and the safety of our neighborhood, but I think police did a very good job, so I have nothing but compliments for our police department.”

General mayhem after the Pride Parade happens every year, with some people historically calling for the parade to be relocated Downtown as a solution, Tunney said.

“But the issue is the post-parade is still going to be up here, and we won’t have the resources,” Tunney said. “So if the parade is downtown, there’s a whole new set of issues about the parade, but I think we’d still have the same post-parade activity up here.”

Tunney’s office will soon meet with the police department to debrief what strategies were or weren’t effective in managing post-parade crowds, he said.

“There were some street closures that didn’t go as well as I thought they would, so it’s more of fine-tuning, but I think the parade went as well as it could,” Tunney said.

Representatives from the Chicago Pride Parade and the Northalsted Business Alliance did not immediately return requests for comment Monday.

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