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It Could Feel Like 110 Degrees This Week In Chicago

A hazardous weather outlook and dangerous heat advisory has been issued as record-high temperatures hit the area.

People enjoy the sunny day at Montrose Beach during hot summery weather on May 10, 2022.
Colin Boyle/Block Club Chicago
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CHICAGO — Temperatures could hit 100 degrees Tuesday in Chicago — and it could feel even warmer than that.

The city will hover around record-high temperatures late Monday into Wednesday, and at times it could feel as hot as 109 degrees, according to the National Weather Service. A hazardous weather outlook and dangerous heat advisory has been issued for the Chicago area, with the weather agency warning residents to limit their time in the sun and to stay hydrated.

“We will be flirting with record-high temperatures for the area here,” said Kevin Birk, a National Weather Service meteorologist. “Temperature-wise, we could see mid- to upper 90s, which is near our records for this time of year.”

Monday’s high temperature is expected to be in the 80s, with cooler temperatures along the lakefront. But that could rise to the low 90s if a thunderstorm expected to hit the area instead misses the city, according to the National Weather Service.

Tuesday will be even hotter: It’s expected to hit 98 degrees, and it could feel like 109.

On Wednesday, temperatures are expected to drop slightly but remain within the heat advisory limit, with highs in the mid-90s. It could feel as warm as 105 degrees.

A northward shift in the jet steam is causing this week’s unusually warm temperatures, as the change allows the atmosphere to warm considerably as air and moisture rise from the Gulf of Mexico, Birk said.

“The jet stream pattern is basically buckling, causing it to do what we call ‘ridge,’ or ‘shift’ northward across the Great Lakes region,” he said. “That’s how we get these hot air masses. And if you combine that with full sunshine, it really can cause the oppressive heat.”

The all-time record high for June 14 was 99 degrees in 1987, according to the National Weather Service. June 15’s record is 95 degrees, set in 1994.

Water temperatures in Lake Michigan remain cool, hovering between 55 and 60 degrees, Birk said.

“The water temp is still pretty chilly,” he said. “That’ll be a pretty good shock to the system.”

A cold front is supposed to move in by Thursday. There is a chance of strong to severe thunderstorms late Wednesday afternoon and into the night, according to National Weather Service.

Chicago has six community cooling centers that are open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. during extreme heat. Their locations:

  • Englewood Center, 1140 W. 79th St.
  • Garfield Center, 10 S. Kedzie Ave.
  • King Center, 4314 S. Cottage Grove Ave.
  • North Area Center, 845 W. Wilson Ave.
  • South Chicago Center, 8650 S. Commercial Ave.
  • Trina Davila Center, 4312 W. North Ave.

Older people can access one of the city’s 21 senior centers. Click here for locations and hours. 

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