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Bronzeville, Near South Side

You Can Help Support Black Girls, Women By Creating Care Boxes At The Ladies Of Virtue LOV Day

Ladies of Virtue provides mentorship to Black young women and girls. It's asking for people to volunteer to fill 350 boxes with gifts and supplies during a Saturday event.

The Ladies Of Virtue are hosting their second annual "LOV" Day Saturday, Feb. 12.
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WASHINGTON PARK — Local nonprofit Ladies Of Virtue is bringing back its LOV Day to spread a little love to Black young women and girls.

The event kicks off Saturday with a packing party at the Imani Community Development Corporation, 2314 E. 83rd St. Anyone can volunteer to help fill 350 boxes with personal protective equipment, teddy bears, manicure kits, hair care products and Black History facts.

The boxes will be given away 4-6 p.m. at the KLEO Center, 119 E. Garfield Blvd. Anyone in need can stop by to grab a box.

Another giveaway will be held noon Monday at Randolph Elementary, 7316 S. Hoyne.

Learn more about the Ladies of Virtue:

Founder and Executive Director Jamila Trimuel said she created the Black History Month event after women who’d gone through the Ladies of Virtue program reached out to tell her how much the program meant to them. The program mentors girls ages 5 to 19.

Several of the women who’d been mentored have struggled with depression and anxiety during the pandemic, Trimuel said. She wanted to do more to connect them to mental health support, thinking it’s important to show they are valued in a world where some still believe Black women don’t feel pain and Black girls are less innocent than others.

“It was birthed from a need to show that Black girls needed to be loved, supported and nurtured,” said Trimuel, a South Shore native who launched the organization 10 years ago.

That belief was also the impetus behind Ladies Of Virtue. Trimuel wanted to provide the kind of guidance and mentorship she longed for in her formal years.

When Trimuel began mentoring teens as a student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, she knew she’d found her purpose. A decade later, her organization has transformed the lives of 1,000 girls and women, several returning as mentors themselves, she said.

“It’s really about standing in the gap for Black women and girls,” Trimuel said. “Positive role models can change the trajectory of your life.”

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