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828 New Confirmed Cases Of Coronavirus, 30 More Deaths Reported In Illinois

Both numbers showed increases from previous days this week, but they are still part of an overall decline since the peak of the crisis in mid-May.

A staff member at Vines On Clark cleans seats Saturday in Wrigleyville.
Colin Boyle/Block Club Chicago
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CHICAGO — Illinois saw 828 new confirmed cases of coronavirus and 30 more deaths in the past day, officials announced Wednesday.

Both numbers were increases from previous days this week, but they are still part of an overall decline since the peak of the crisis in mid-May. This weekend’s deaths were the lowest numbers in three months.

In total, Illinois has seen 6,951 people die from COVID-19. There have been 144,013 confirmed cases, with the vast majority of people having recovered.

The state’s rolling positivity rate is now at 2.6 percent. That’s the seven-day average of people who test positive for COVID-19. It showed no day-over-day change.

Chicago’s positivity rate is 4.6 percent, up from Tuesday’s 4.5 percent.

The positivity rate is one of several metrics used to gauge the spread of the virus. With Illinois now in the first week of the loosened restrictions of Phase 4, officials are closely watching for the sort of spikes seen in other places that reopened earlier this summer.

Mayor Lori Lightfoot warned Wednesday against reading too much into rising numbers.

“Every single day, we look at a very specific set of public health metrics. We look at hospitalizations, we look at ICU beds” and percent positivity, she said. “If we weren’t [trending down], we wouldn’t be opening up. … If we see that we’re heading in the wrong direction, I’m not gonna hesitate to take action.”

The mayor urged all Chicagoans to keep protecting themselves and others by wearing face coverings and social distancing.

“We still have a lot of COVID in Chicago. We still do. It hasn’t disappeared … . We still are seeing people every single day die from COVID, and we’re still seeing cases, new cases. That’s the reality,” she said.

” … None of us are immune. All of us are at risk. … Whether or not we can continue to make progress depends on all of us.”