Skip to contents
Hyde Park, Woodlawn, South Shore

Hyde Park’s First Unitarian Church To Host Food Distribution Site Tuesday Afternoon

Those in need of food can stop by the church, 5650 S. Woodlawn Ave., from 3–6 p.m. Tuesday. Organizers are also requesting donations of money and supplies.

Left: Volunteers stand in front of a table of donated food at Monday's First Unitarian Church of Chicago food distribution. Right: The entry to the church's food drive Monday.
  • Credibility:

HYDE PARK — Food and supplies will be available at First Unitarian Church of Chicago in Hyde Park from 3–6 p.m. Tuesday.

Those in need can stop by the church, 5650 S. Woodlawn Ave. Organizers are also requesting donations of money and supplies, as well as volunteers to sustain the effort.

Bread, peanut butter, cereal and canned vegetables are some of the most needed items. Nonperishable foods, shelf-stable produce and paper goods are also being requested.

Donations are being accepted starting around 2 p.m., and you can sign up to volunteer here. Organizer Annalisa Perez is accepting financial donations for grocery runs through Venmo, @annalisa-perez.

First Unitarian organizers gave out food and supplies Monday in collaboration with church organizers and members of the Chicago Teachers Union, after Chicago Public Schools temporarily suspended its free meal program. The CPS food program restarted Tuesday after the one-day shutdown.

More than 40 families received meals and the effort received $2,500 in donations Monday, according to Rev. Teri Schwartz, senior co-minister at First Unitarian. If there’s demand, organizers expect to serve about 60 families Tuesday.

It remains to be seen whether the food drive will continue beyond Tuesday, Schwartz said.

“We’re building the ship while sailing, hour by hour,” Schwartz said.

She said all donations will go to addressing food insecurity in the neighborhood, whether through the church or in partnership with the Hyde Park-Kenwood food pantry down the block.

“This is a moment in which our communities are so actively grieving and have righteous anger and are uprising,” Schwartz said. “This is the time we must come together in solidarity for racial justice … and meeting the needs of our neighbors.”

Subscribe to Block Club Chicago. Every dime we make funds reporting from Chicago’s neighborhoods.

Already subscribe? Click here to support Block Club with a tax-deductible donation.