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Lincoln Square, North Center, Irving Park

Help Flooding In, But Duck With 6-Pack Plastic Around His Head Hasn’t Been Seen Since Tuesday Afternoon

Neighbors used boats and nets from the shore to try and catch the duck Tuesday, but to no avail.

Some of the group that tried to help the duck on Tuesday morning. Pictured left to right: Nicle Burris, Mika Hinami, Sol Hinami, Andrea Knepper, Tess Smith-Meseth, Maggie O’Neill and Martin Kusumosurarso. Others were there earlier in the day but had to leave as noon approached.
Alex Hernandez/ Block Club Chicago
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IRVING PARK  — The North Branch duck with its head stuck in a plastic six-pack holder hasn’t been seen since Tuesday afternoon.

But that doesn’t mean that neighbors are going to stop trying to help the injured mallard.

Tess Smith-Meseth, one of the group of neighbors trying to rescue the injured duck near Horner Park, was on the river again Wednesday morning.

Smith-Meseth and a group of neighbors have been at the northwest corner of the park, near the bridge on Montrose Avenue, trying to capture the mallard since last Saturday to remove the garbage around its mouth and wrapped around its neck.

On Tuesday, the group used boats and nets from the shore to try and catch the duck. And members of the Chicago Fire Department as well as people from the nonprofit Flint Creek Wildlife Rehabilitation came out twice on Tuesday before calling it quits, Smith-Meseth said.

But the duck still eluded capture.

RELATED: Duck With Plastic 6-Pack Holder Around Its Head Eludes Army Of Rescuers On North Branch Of Chicago River

On Wednesday morning, Smith-Meseth was back out on the riverbank, where the duck and its mate appear to be nesting, keeping watch for the injured mallard’s return so she can resume the neighborhood’s rescue efforts.

The concern for the duck began with a Saturday Facebook post by Holly Swyers. She asked neighbors what could be done to help.

Since speaking to Block Club, she’s been contacted by a number of avian veterinarians, animal trappers and other concerned neighbors offering their advice and skills.

“So many people have reached out to me, I’m having trouble keeping up,” Smith-Meseth said. “One bird doctor told us he may be able to survive on algae. But I’m still afraid he’s going to be easy prey or get the rings caught on something and drown.”

Anyone hoping to volunteer with the ongoing rescue effort is being asked to contact Smith-Meseth via her business at 773-558-3488 or thegratefuldawgchi@gmail.com.

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