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Here Are The Locations For Divvy’s 36 New Stations Across Chicago

River North, Englewood, Ukrainian Village and the Near West Side will all get new Divvy stations.

A Divvy station at LaSalle and Illinois in River North.
Alisa Hauser/Block Club Chicago
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CHICAGO — Finding a Divvy station just got easier, with the addition of 36 new stations that will bring the total number of rental kiosks to more than 600 in Chicago and Evanston.

On Tuesday, Divvy leaders and officials from the Chicago Department of Transportation announced plans to add the new stations funded through the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality program at a press conference at the newest station at Malcom X College, 1900 W. Jackson St.

A spokeswoman for Divvy was unable to provide the amount of funding received from the federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality program for the expanded stations. 

The new stations are being added to River North, Englewood, Ukrainian Village and the Near West Side to account for growing ridership and to help support riders in the system’s busiest districts, officials said.

Credit: Divvy
New 2018 stations are marked by a black dot.

The new stations, scheduled to be installed in the coming weeks, will be at these locations:

  • Wood Street & Chicago Avenue
  • Central Park Avenue & Bloomingdale Avenue
  • Wood Street & Augusta Boulevard
  • Leavitt Street & Chicago Avenue 
  • LaSalle Street & Huron Street
  • Leavitt Street & Division Street 
  • Lake Shore Drive & Chicago Avenue
  • State Street & 54th Street
  • Cornell Drive & Hayes Drive
  • Eggleston Avenue & 69th Street
  • Michigan Avenue & 71st Street
  • Rhodes Avenue & 71st Street
  • South Chicago Avenue & Elliott Avenue
  • Damen Avenue & 37th Street
  • Elizabeth Street & 59th Street
  • Carpenter Street & 63rd Street
  • Stewart Avenue & 63rd Street
  • Homan Avenue & Arthington Street
  • Campbell Avenue & Grand Avenue
  • Damen Avenue & Jackson Boulevard
  • Racine Avenue & Washington Boulevard
  • Damen Avenue & Lake Street
  • Ashland Avenue & Jackson Boulevard
  • Western Avenue & Fillmore Street
  • Ashland Avenue & Bloomingdale Avenue 
  • Bernard Street & Elston Avenue 
  • Latrobe Avenue & Chicago Avenue
  • Kildare Avenue & Montrose Avenue
  • Hoyne Avenue & Balmoral Avenue
  • Fairbanks Street & Superior Street
  • Franklin Street & Ohio Street
  • Orleans Street & Hubbard Street
  • Clinton Street & Washington Boulevard
  • Canal Street & Jackson Boulevard
  • Lincoln Park Conservatory
  • Clark Street & Newport Street
  • Lakefront Trail & Wilson Avenue 
  • Sheridan Road & Columbia Avenue 

Divvy launched in late June 2013 and currently has a fleet of more than 5,800 bikes at 570 stations. Its members or ride pass users have collectively taken more than 15 million trips on the sky blue bikes, the Sun-Times reported in June.

The new station at Malcolm X College opened on Tuesday while the remainder of the new stations are set to open over the next few months.

To celebrate the new stations, Divvy plans to host pop-up events at the stations, where Divvy outreach leaders will be available to answer questions about how to use the bike share system and hand out free passes for neighbors to try the bikes. The Divvy team will announce these events in their email newsletter and on social media. 

In addition to the expanded stations, Divvy improved its system this year by adding a $3 single ride option, increasing ride time for annual members from 30 to 45 minutes and launching a Divvy App, which allows riders to access bikes from their mobile phones. The app has already been downloaded almost 100,000 times, officials said.

Divvy cost $99 for an annual membership and also offers a Divvy for Everyone subsidized membership program that charges $5 for the first year and gradually increases over four years until it maxes out at $75 a year.

As of Wednesday, there are 37,647 annual Divvy members and those members, combined with day pass or single-ride users, have collectively taken 16.3 million trips and pedaled 33.5 million miles on the bike share system’s fleet of 6,000 bicycles